HOW IS DRY ICE MADE?

 

It is manufactured by compressing and cooling gaseous CO2 under high pressure to initially produce liquid CO2. The liquid is then allowed to expand under a reduced pressure to produce CO2 snow, and finally the snow is compressed by a hydraulic press into convenient Dry Ice blocks, slices or pellets.

The density of the compressed CO2 snow depends on the applied pressure and the pressure time. The density of the Dry Ice block can reach 1.56g/cm3 as a maximum at a temperature of -78.64oC.

We manufacture our Dry Ice using the world's leading dry ice manufacturing equipment, afterall, the premier quality of our dry ice can only be achieved through manufacturing under such high densities.
Conventional cleaning methods

Cleaning processes are necessary in all industries...
Production residue, carbon deposits, release agents, soot and all types of airborne contamination are the byproducts of our times. Dirt infiltrates equipment, corrodes machinery, damages buildings and ultimately can cause considerable destruction. The consequences are often significant and very costly.

- Increased wear and tear
- Decrease of quality / quantity
- Prolonged cleaning / equipment downtime
- Poor appearance
- Safety issues

The quality and safety of machines, tools, moulds and components must be maintained and protected. Coated surfaces may have to be stripped periodically for recoating.

Conventional methods are increasingly problematic
The quality and safety of machines, tools, moulds and components must be maintained and protected. Coated surfaces may have to be stripped periodically for recoating.

Various cleaning methods have been in use for decades, and many commonplace practices involve all types of solvents, often with many hours of manual labor.

Sand blasting, powder blasting, grit blasting, etc. These blasting methods are often problematic. They do the job but often remove part of the surface material together with the contamination, and may thereby damage the substrate. Therefore conventional blasting methods tend to create more problems than solutions to their users.

Water and steam blasting within complex machines/equipment systems is never advisable. Electric parts and electronics can be damaged by the moisture; here safety is an important issue.

Solvents containing CFCs have been outlawed for some time now, with more demanding legislation yet to come. Biodegradable "friendly agents" are unfortunately not very effective in many applications. Here the ever increasing cost of manual labor is a factor.

Industrial cleaning with solvents and manual labor - and with the above-mentioned well-known blasting techniques - is practiced everywhere, but can be time-consuming, costly, possibly hazardous to people and equipment, and often do not produce satisfactory results.